Dismay Disco original notes [6: ver. 1 & 2]

2 Jan 2009     [Highlighted: Dismay Disco Chapter 6, indicating that these are the notes for chapter 6, not the draft itself.]

In old black and white classics there is often a [scribble] main character who thinks he’s charming, handsome and sophisticated. Some [scribbled out: “modest”; “office worker or rich art dilettante with” (scribble) — these don’t make sense because they’re misc. notes] suited professional with cuff links and a full-service bar in the corner of his living room. A dilettante in both art and literature, his library is filled wall-to-wall [left margin, scribbled out: “and floor to ceiling”] with books he’s skimmed and marked. Famous paintings hang single file in his hallway: they’re originals he bought at auction. He always [insert: “carries” above, scribbled out “has” (scribble)]  a glass of [insert: “champagne” above, scribble (possibly “brandy”) below] in one hand and a cigarette in the other. He speaks slowly and with feigned thoughtfulness to ensure that what he’s saying sounds profound, [scribbled out “and”] elegant, and most importantly, sexy. For all of this haughtiness, for all of these chocolates decorated with flecks of gold and served on silk, for every bottle of Merlot, you would be surprised that [insert: “all” scribbled out] his wealth and all this brouhaha are merely a byproducts [the “a” is a mistake; the line formerly read “a byproduct”] of his father’s nepotism and not the reward [another mistake] for years abroad studying his craft or any other genuine source of pride.

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10 Mar 2009

In old black and white classics there is often a character who thinks he’s charming, handsome and sophisticated. Some suited professional with cuff links and a full service bar in the corner of his living room. [insert: Excuse me, parlor.] A dilettante in both art and literature, his library is stacked carpet to crest with books he’s skimmed and marked. Famous paintings hang single file in his hallway; they’re originals he bought at [scribble] auction. He always carries a glass of [insert: some] nondescript alcoholic drink in one hand and a cigarette in the other. He speaks slowly and with feigned thoughtfulness as if he’s recalling [scribble] something from one of his many profound life experiences (which will undoubtedly be told later at lunch as witty anecdotes). For all of this haughtiness, for all of these chocolates decorated with flecks of twenty-four karat gold and served on silk, for every bottle of Merlot, you would be surprised that his wealth and all this brouhaha are merely byproducts of his father’s nepotism and not the rewards for years abroad studying his craft or any other genuine source of pride.

He was in my graduating class in high school.

  • Ben Gottschalk

    I’m in love with these notes. I’ve read them so many times over the course of the last few months, but I still can’t get over my dislike for the dilettante. I know people like him, but your description is bizarre and disgusting. He seems to be literally from a movie. His experiences are created for him, because he’s just a character in a script. He’s manufactured and written in the most obvious way, but he himself is the writer.